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Winona LaDuke On Redemption

Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe activist) speaks on the process of apology, redemption and healing; through the story of the Pawnee tribe and their return home to their native land in Nebraska.

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Winona LaDuke, Expert Testimony to Environmental Improvement Board, State of New Mexico.

In 2011, Winona LaDuke had the privilege of submitting expert testimony to the Environmental Improvement Board in New Mexico. Ms. LaDuke issued the following testimony on behalf of New Energy Economy, an organization dedicated to creating economic opportunity in New Mexico powered by clean energy. Making this the only testimony in support of a carbon-cap legislation in the country. The file is made available by Honor The Earth to the general public and parties interested in increasing their knowledge and capacity towards clean energy systems.

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Prevent a Tar Sands Disaster

What does it mean to live in an energy sacrifice zone? For many First Nations of Canada, it means that the land and water your families have lived on for generations is no longer safe. Nearly every major oil company in the world is participating in making the homelands of indigenous peoples unsafe by investing in the Athabascan tar sands.

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National Congress of American Indians Opposes Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline

Today, the nation’s oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), announced their opposition to the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline.  This important announcement adds to the growing chorus of voices across the United States opposed to this pipeline and clearly finds that an additional tar sands pipeline is not in the national interest.

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Fix or Nix: The Environment & Technology

How can technology best be used to foster environmental sustainability? Journalist Mark Hertsgaard – the environment correspondent for The Nation and author of the recent book, Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth – will raise that question and others at what promises to be a provocative dialogue with two environmental thought leaders: Stewart Brand and Winona LaDuke.

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Radio Interview with Winona: What's the history between the US military and American Indians?

What's the historical relationship between the US military and American Indians? On the next Your Call, we'll have a conversation with Winona LaDuke, author of The Militarization of Indian Country. She writes, "Native people have seen their way of life destroyed by the military." It began with colonization and continues with military testing on native lands and using words like Apache and Blackhawk to name military equipment. Interview by Rose Aguilar.

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Video Highlights from Winona LaDuke and Stewart Brand Debate

On July 21st, Honor's Executive Director, Winona LaDuke, debated Stewart Brand, publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog and more recently known for asking environmentalists to reconsider opposing nuclear power and GMOs. The event was hosted by Earth Island Journal in Berkeley, CA, below are some video highlights of the event.

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We Have a Shot to Stop the Tar Sands

Topic of Discussion: The Alberta Tar Sands; the Heavy Haul and Using the Columbia River as a Means to Transport Coal and Oil Drilling Equipment.

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It's Time To Call the Indian Wars to An End

That the death of Osama bin Laden was relayed with the words "Geronimo EKIA [Enemy Killed in Action]" prompted a din of protest in the halls of Congress.

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Winona LaDuke Explores The Militarization of Indian Country From Geronimo to Bin Laden

Winona LaDuke, a Native American activist and twice Ralph Nader's Green Party Vice Presidential Candidate , has written a dramatic and prescient book, The Militarization of Indian Country (Honor the Earth). Completed in February 2011, the book is currently at press and comes on the heels of the capture and killing of Osama bin Laden, also known as "Geronimo EKIA" (Enemy Killed in Action). When the code name for bin Laden was revealed, Native American groups sat up and took notice. Harlyn Geronimo, a great grandson of the legendary Apache chief, asked Congress for a formal apology.

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